“Breakfast”(1936) by John Steinbeck(1902-1968) を読んで


This thing fills me with pleasure. I don’t know why, I can see it in the smallest detail. I find myself recalling it again and again, each time bringing more detail out of sunken memory, remembering brings the curious warm pleasure.

It was very early in the morning. The eastern mountains were black-blue*1, but behind them the light stood up faintly colored at the mountain rims with a washed red, growing colder, grayer and darker as it went up and overhead until, at a place near the west, it merged with pure night.

And it was cold, not painfully so, but cold enough so that I rubbed my hands and shoved them deep into my pockets, and I hunched my shoulders up and scuffled my feet on the ground. Down in the valley where I was, the earth was that lavender grey*2 of dawn. I walked along a country road and ahead of me I saw a tent that was only a little lighter grey than the ground. Beside the tent there was a flash of orange fire seeping out of the cracks of an old rusty iron stove. Grey smoke spurted up out of the stubby stovepipe, spurted up a long way before it spread out and dissipated.

I saw a young woman beside the stove, really a girl. She was dressed in a faded cotton skirt and waist. As I came close I saw that she carried a baby in a crooked arm and the baby was nursing, its head under her waist out of the cold. The mother moved about, poking the fire, shifting the rusty lids of the stove to make a greater draft, opening the oven door; and all the time the baby was nursing, but that didn’t interfere with the mother’s work, nor with the light quick gracefulness of her movements. There was something very precise and practiced in her movements. The orange fire flicked out of the cracks in the stove and threw dancing reflections on the tent.

I was close now and I could smell frying bacon and baking bread, the warmest, pleasantest odors I know. From the east the light grew swiftly. I came near to the stove and stretched my hands out to it and shivered all over when the warmth struck me. Then the tent flap jerked up and a young man came out and an older man followed him. They were dressed in new blue dungarees and in new dungaree coats with brass buttons shining. They were sharp-faced men, and they looked much alike.

The younger had a dark stubble beard and the older had a grey stubble beard. Their heads and faces were wet, their hair dripped with water, and water stood out on their stiff beards and their cheeks shone with water. Together they stood looking quietly at the lightening east; they yawned together and looked at the light on the hill rims. They turned and saw me.

“Morning,” said the older man. His face was neither friendly nor unfriendly.

“Morning, sir,” I said.

“Morning,” said the young man.

The water was slowly drying on their faces. They came to the stove and warmed their hands at it.

The girl kept to her work, her face averted and her eyes on what she was doing. Her hair was tied back out of her eyes with a string and it hung down her back and swayed as she worked. She set tin cups on a big packing box, set tin plates and knives and forks out too. Then she scooped fried bacon out of the deep grease and laid it on a big tin platter, and the bacon cricked and rustled as it grew crisp. She opened the rusty oven door and took out a square pan full of high big biscuits.

When the smell of that hot bread came out, both of the men inhaled deeply. The young man said softly, “Keerist*3!”

The elder man turned to me, “Had your breakfast?”

“No.”

“Well, sit down with us, then.”*4

That was the signal. We went to the packing case and squatted on the ground about it. The young man asked, “Picking cotton?”

“No.”

“We have twelve days’ work so far,” the young man said.

The girl spoke from the stove. “They even got new clothes.”

The two men looked down at their new dungarees and they both smiled a little.

The girl set out the platter of bacon, the brown high biscuits, a bowl of bacon gravy and a pot of coffee, and then she squatted down by the box too. The baby was still nursing, its head up under her waist out of the cold. I could hear the sucking noises it made.

We filled our plates, poured bacon gravy over our biscuits and sugared our coffee. The older man filled his mouth full and he chewed and chewed and swallowed. Then he said, “God Almighty, it’s good,” and he filled his mouth again.

The young man said, “We been eating good for twelve days.”

We all ate quickly, frantically, and refilled our plates and are quickly again until we were full and warm.*5 The hot bitter coffee scalded our throats. We threw the last little bit with the grounds in it on the earth and refilled our cups.

There was color in the light now, a reddish gleam that made the air seem colder. The two men faced the east and their faces were lighted by the dawn, and I looked up for a moment and saw the image of the mountain and the light coming over it reflected in the older man’s eyes.

Then the two men threw the grounds from their cups on the earth and they stood up together. “Got to get going,” the older man said.

The younger turned to me. “ ’Fyou*6 want to pick cotton, we could maybe get you on.”

“No. I got to go along. Thanks for breakfast.”

The older man waved his hand in a negative. “O.K. Glad to have you.” They walked away together. The air was blazing with light at the eastern skyline. And I walked away down the country road.

That’s all. I know, of course, some of the reasons why it was pleasant. But there was some element of great beauty*7 there that makes the rush of warmth when I think of it.

美しいですね、確かに美しい!
思わず、気合が入りました。
下線部*3の Keerist は、 Christ を意味するようです。
また、下線部*6の Fyou は、その後の調べで、instead of “if you” だとわかりました。

文学的には、
①下線部*7の、some element of great beauty は何か?ということになるかと思いますが、これについて考えることは楽しいですね。
やはり、great beauty の核になるのは、こんなに貧しいのに、少しでも食べ物に余裕のある時があれば、その時は、人に惜しみなく与える、ということでしょうか。
下線部*4の “Well, sit down with us, then.” いいですね、ここは。
「じゃ、一緒に座って食っていけよ。」くらいでしょうか。
ちなみに、まったく見知らぬ男に対してですからね。
baby が、母の乳を吸う音、これも間違いなく、偉大なる美の要素に入ってくると思います。(後日記1)
結局、このことについてずっと考えていくと、人は仕事(彼らの場合は綿摘み)やお金や品物などよりも、大事なものが心の中にあるよ、ということに行き着くのではないでしょうか。
小さな満足、小さな幸せ、満ち足りた感謝の思い、無い物ねだりをしないというか、無い物ねだりのしようもないことなど、等身大で、ありのままの姿でいることが、実は、心の中に無限大の富をもたらすということについて、作者は指摘いるのではないでしょうか。
いずれにいたしましても、この核心部分には、作者の新約聖書の影響を強く感じます。

②次に、この woman ならぬ、girl の年齢を、どのあたりに設定するかについては興味があります。
僕の意見は、まだ十代のように考えましたが。やはり通常、二十代の女性に対しては、girl を用いないのではないでしょうか。そこから考えて、どうみてもその夫である young man は、おそらくはまだ二十代。そうしますと、これもどうみてもその父である older man は、一読すると、かなりの年長者のような印象を受けますが、年取っていたとしても五十代、もしくはさらに若い四十代ということも考えられますが、ひげの色から四十代前半ではないように思います。
girl 十代説に異論があるとすれば、彼女の主婦業があまりに手慣れていることでしょうか。

③下線部*5の We all ate quickly, frantically, and refilled our plates and are quickly again until we were full and warm. につきましては、旧約聖書の出エジプト記12章との関連で、何か考えられるのでしょうか。
僕には、これでもう12日間も、うまいものにありついていて、さらにガツガツ食べているとは、ちょっと考えられないのですが。
えっ!それで12(日間)を暗示でもってきたのか?
この12ですが、twelve days’ work、twelve days と、2回繰り返されていますよね。
これには、明らかに作者の意図を感じます。
最初に訳した時に、12という数字に、興味をもちました。
何故、12なのだろうという関心です。普通、これで、10日間うまいものを食っているとか、2週間働いたとか、言うのではないでしょうか。
今のところ、僕に考えられることは、
1. 旧約聖書との関係。2. 獣帯の数に等しい12、すなわち黄道十二宮。3. 単に数量の単位としてのダース、dozen。
この内、3 はないように思います。

④非常に謎めいていて、興味深いのは、young man から作者(語り手)が「綿摘み?」って訊かれますよね、「いや」って答える。また、最後にこれも young man から「仕事世話してやれると思うよ。」ってオファーを受けますが、作者は断りますよね。
で、一人でまた country road を歩いて行く、ここですね。
ここで、第三者的な距離ができて、作者が一連の出来事を客観的にみているような感じがぐっと出てくる。
同時に、仕事を求めて、みんなが必死にさまよっている時に、仕事を見つけるのは難しいからと、あるいはまた自分たちだけ仕事にありついていれば、それでいいってもんじゃないよなと、救いの手を差し伸べたのに断られて、じゃ、この人はいったい何をやっているんだ、という曖昧な感じが出てきます。
つまり、よくわからない奇妙な男だなと思われる。でも作者である語り手(ジョン・スタインベック)からみれば、彼は彼で、西部の農家を作家として取材や勉強のために見て回っている訳です。
ここのところの整合性が物語の上で、少しぎくしゃくしている感があります。
しかし、older man は、”O.K. Glad to have you.” と返す。
朝食もたっぷりととらせてあげたのに、ここのところ。
粋とかではない、粋とか、ハードボイルドとかの解釈ではない、何かもっと素朴なものを感じます。
おそらくその本質は、older man がこれまで生きてきた、彼の人生に対する姿勢、そのものの中にあるのではないでしょうか。

次に絵画的には、お話ししたい事がたくさんあり、作者の非常に豊かでスケールの大きな色彩的感覚を感じます。
具体的には、下線部*1や同*2の black-blue ですとか、lavender grey などは、なかなか他の作家に出てこない色彩の表現です。
ポイントとしては、
①移ろいゆく東方の山々の景色の色を、この物語の中のどこかの場面でとらえられるか。
これにつきましては、毎日、森の中で生活している僕には、そしてもうすっかり樹木の葉が落ちた特にこれからの季節は、山の rims や、skyline は、日常的でとらえやすかったです、と言いますか、今朝も山のへりからのぼる太陽を猫と見つめましたが、問題はその色です。(後日記2)

②冒頭の作者が足をひきづりながら歩いて行く先に見えたテントの色をとらえ切れるか。

③これも冒頭の古い錆びた鉄ストーブのひびや割れ目からしみ出るオレンジの火、さらに threw dancing reflections on the tent.
このあたりでしょうか。

この業界の方でしたら、代表作「怒りの葡萄」を読んでも、「ハツカネズミと人間」や「赤い小馬」、そしてこの短編を読んでも、もう即座に連想すると思いますが、執筆された当時の西部の様子や人物描写につきましては、写真家 Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) の大恐慌時代の作品を観るに限ります。
そこで、先の文学的にはの②に戻りますが、彼女の写真を凝視すればするほど、例えば、この被写体の女性に対しては、通常、woman を用いるだろうな、とか一つ一つ具体的に考えていきますと、作者がこの短編の中で、girl と表記している以上、やはり十代なのではないだろうかと、思えてしまうのです。

さあ、ここから、転じて、”Breakfast for the girl” のタイトルで絵が描けるか?
もちろん、この女の子です。ですから、日本語からの訳出にあえてこだわるなら、”Breakfast for this girl” です。
これは、素晴らしいですね、夢がありますね。
“Breakfast for the girl” が描けたら、どんなにいいだろうかという、それはこの物語から僕が得た自分への励ましであり、勇気や希望です。

総じてこのお話は、バランスに優れていると言いますか、まとまりがあると言いますか、絵画的には、なぜか今、とっさに物語の内容や性質上から、水彩画を思い浮かべましたが、J.M.W.Turner (1775-1851)の作品を持ち出すまでもなく、絵画のもつ荘厳さにはかなわないのではないでしょうか。
別に優劣をつけるような問題ではありませんし、ただ文学と絵画の両分野をあえて比較するならという程度の意味合いですが、最初のテントが見えてきたシーンをもっとぐるぐると、思いっきりぐるぐるとふり回せば、物語のバランスも当然崩れてきますし、支離滅裂になって、面白かったのではないのかなと、思いました。
ちなみに、水彩画の本場イギリスには、ターナーと同世代に、Thomas Girtin (1775-1802) という夭折の天才がいました。
この業界の方はもちろん別にして、日本ではこうした天才もあまりと言いますか、ほとんど知られていませんね。ターナーよりも天才です。僕は実物の作品を、Tate Britain で観てはっきりとそう思いました。
ターナー自身ももしかしたら、こいつは俺よりもすごい才能だなあ、と感じていたのかもしれません。
ああ、そうか!ターナーには、それがあったのかもしれないですね。
若くして亡くなった友の分も、自分は頑張ろうという、その思いが終生彼の心の支えとなり、立ち向かう気迫や執念となり・・・。
やはりなんといっても尋常ではありませんから、年老いてまでの彼の制作ぶりは、桁が違うと言いますか、並外れています。

日本の展覧会は、「The 固定」です。
50年後に、すなわち2071年に、印象派展を開催している可能性はかなりあります。
とても素晴らしいことでもあり、同時に、やや残念なことでもありますね。

どうして、このテキストにたどり着いたのかにつきましては、長くなりますので、また別の機会にしますが、会話の部分を、必ず間を一行空けてくるスタイルには、しびれました。

2021年11月14日
和田 健

後日記1:この baby なのですが、この作品が発表されたのが、1936年ですので、まあ普通に考えて、その前年に作品が執筆されたと仮定(あくまで仮定です)すれば、1935年頃の生まれかなあ、と思います。
そうしますと、10才で第二次世界大戦の終わりを迎えていたことになり、これは、1935年生まれの僕の母の年齢とぴったり一致いたします。
そうしますと、この物語は、私 (baby) はまだ母の乳を吸っていたので、まるで記憶にないけれど、ある寒い朝、カリフォルニアの私たちの貧しいテントを訪れた行きずりの見知らぬ男が書いた、私の父と母と、その頃はまだ若かった祖父の物語を、私のちょうど子どもの世代にあたる海の向こうの一日本人が、それから85年もして読んだ、という構図になります。
この全体の構図の中の何かに、僕は異常に惹きつけられました。
この baby のその後の人生の物語は、どうなっただろうかという・・・、プラス旧約聖書の読み込み、例えばヨセフの物語などから、僕の頭の中の何かが突破できないだろうかという強い思い。

(注)その後の調べで、PENGUIN BOOKS 版の資料から、この作品は、1936年11月9日発行の the Pacific Weekly Vol. 5 に、初めて掲載されたこと、1934年の8月の終わりごろまでには、草稿が書かれていたことがわかりました。

後日記2:猫を抱いて朝日に向かいながら、試してみたのですが、猫の目に朝日がはっきりと反射して、すごく、それは本当にきれいなんですね。
そこで思ったのですが、この場面で、older man の目に光が反射するのではなくて、このシーンで、テントから飼い猫が飛び出してきて、そこいらの物の上に座り、じっと山の向こうからのぼりくる陽光を見つめる、という設定はどうでしょうか。
つまり、登場人物は、baby を入れて全部で5人ですよね、ここで一回人間以外のものに、ベクトルをふり向ける、という流れで、休憩、ふっと一回息がつけます。
その分、5人だけで展開してきた物語の緊迫感が損なわれますが、何か斜線が一本引けるように思います。
これは僕が、絵画で「間が抜けている」と呼んで大切にしているものに相当します。
その場合、作者がこれだけ色彩について、詳細に描写していますので、問題は猫の色ですね、つまりはその柄です。
僕は、咄嗟にサビかキジトラを連想しましたが、皆さんは何柄を思い浮かべましたか。
絵画的には、ロシアンブルーが入っている雑種などが登場すると、ほぼ完璧でしょうか。

2021年11月17日
和田 健

後日記3:今日になって気づいたのですが、男3人が先に食卓として使っている荷箱のところへ行って、まわりの地面に座りますよね。
その後、食事を荷箱の上に並べ終えてから、girl も来て荷箱のそばに座りますよね。
これは貧しくて椅子もないからだと、そのことを繰り返し浮かび上がらせるための強調のようなものだと、これまで単純に解釈していたのですが、違うのではないか、別の意味が隠されているのではないかと思いました。
確かに最初に訳した時に、変だなあ、いくら貧乏でも直接地面に座り込んで食事をするのかと、そのへんのバケツでもなんでもひっくり返して座ればいいじゃないかと、心に何かが引っかかるような違和感があったのですが。
確信はもてませんが、気になりますので、少し調べてみます。

2021年11月18日
和田 健

後日記4:冒頭の部分を繰り返し読めば読むほど、この物語は事実なのだと思います。
つまり、このお話は作者の創作ではなく、作者が西部の農家を回っていた時に、実際にある朝、経験した出来事なのだと思います。
そうしますと、結論と言いますか、まとめになりますが、作者は、この baby を含む親子4人を聖なるものとして、聖家族としてとらえているのではないでしょうか。
この世の中には、こんなに飾り気のない人々も現実にいるんだなあと、どちらかというと、作者は驚いた、衝撃を受けたのかもしれません。
そのことが、僕の中で、やはり後日記3 を支持する根拠として浮かび上がってくるのです。
聖なる家族が、荷箱のそばに座り込んだ時、作者は、思わず内心、声にならない喜びの声を発したのではないでしょうか?「うぉー!」と。
いろいろな英文の資料にも目を通してみましたが、これについては一様に、貧乏なので椅子もテーブルもないという観点ばかりでした。
僕は、違うのではないかと思う。これは何か旧約聖書の観点からきているのではないかと感じます。
絵画的には、この荷箱の食事のシーンに聖なる三角形を観てとることができるように思います。
すなわち、older man、young man、girl & baby なる三角形です。

また上記12の数字について触れている資料は、一つも見当たりませんでした。
つまり、誰も問題にしていませんが、僕は作者からのメッセージを明らかに感じます。
このように、作者が意図的に繰り返している時は、まず大体何かあります。
少なくとも、何かあると思って読み込んだ方が賢明です。

最後に、いろいろな物騒な事件の起きるコロナ禍の今こそ、また格差社会のこうした難しい時代にあればこそ、この作品は、是非とも読まれるべき実に貴重な温かい物語だという気がいたします。
そしてひとたび、もっとより多くの方に、この作品が知られるようになりますと、短編は誰もがすぐに読めることから、短い作品であることの強みを大いに発揮いたしますね。

以上ですが、僕の課題が、3点残りました。
1. 何故、地面に座り込んで食事をしたのか(これについては解明できる気がしています)。
2. 12の数字の意味するところ。
3. 内緒!にしておきたいところですが、僕の仕事上、もうお分かりですね。早速、制作に入りました。

2021年11月20日
和田 健

後日記5:昨日、雪かきをした後、薪ストーブの火を見つめながら、ぼんやりと考えていたのですが、この物語全体を振り返って、改めて考えてみれば、girl の台詞は、”They even got new clothes.” のたった一つしかないんですよね。
その前の young man の話を受けて、「それでね、彼らは、服を新調したのよ。」くらいでしょうか。
12日間の労働で得た賃金で、そしてこれは「怒りの葡萄」を読めばよくわかるように、明らかに日給であると思われますが、男二人は、自分たちのダンガリーのズボンと、さらには上着までをも新調している。
それに対して、彼女自身はどうかと言えば、新しい服を買ってもらうこともなく、色あせたコットンのスカートとウエストを着ているんです。
つまり、着古した服を相変わらずそのまま着ている。
でも、不幸な感じがまったくしないんですよね。
この唯一のセリフの中に、陰湿な響きは感じとれない、嫌味やとげがない。
彼女は、幸せそうですね。
そして、作者は彼女が幸せであることを、明らかに感じとっている。
ここのところに肝心なポイントが、何か秘められているように思いました。

2021年11月29日
和田 健

お断り:この短編物語につきましては、インターネット上に、細かい点で語句に違いのあるテキストが、実際に何例か見られましたので、僕としては、PENGUIN BOOKS 版に準拠して、一字一句可能な限り、チェックしました。

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: